Human History Revolves Around Theft & Who Is “Allowed” To Steal

The entirety of human history has been shaped by one thing: theft.  Depending on who is allowed to steal the fruits of labor and how much leeway they gave themselves to steal has had an effect on every aspect of humanity’s history.

Taxation is theft. It’s a simple concept and not debatable.  Justification of it makes it nonetheless theft. And according to British author and co-host of Money Pit Dominic Frisby, the legalized theft by governments has been responsible for every war, mass murder, and revolution.  Frisby joined Keiser Report to discuss the history of taxation and how humans have been transformed into cattle to fund the overbearing and violent nanny state we are all living under.

A big believer in low taxes, Frisby says labor should be taxed far less than it is now, noting that 50 percent of governments’ revenue is derived from income tax.  That’s a lot of stealing.

Go to 13:15 to hear what Frisby has to say about the governments of the world giving themselves the “right” to steal from others. 

“The ultimate form of taxation is, of course, slavery, where you lose all ownership of your labor,” he says, adding that throughout history taxes had unintended consequences.  But if stealing 100% of the fruits of a person’s labor is slavery, at what point is it no longer enslavement? “The entire history of the world, the entire history of civilization, has been shaped by taxation. As I said, every revolution, every war is funded by taxes,” Frisby remarked, according to RT.

Dominic Frisby is the author of Daylight Robbery: How Tax Shaped Our Past and Will Change Our Future.

For most people, tax is something we pay, simply because we must. We seldom think much more about it; in fact, tax is something we’d rather forget.

But the reality is that tax is the key to power. No government can survive without tax revenue – it is the fuel that every state, large and small, runs on. Many of the problems we face today, not least the enormous wealth gaps between rich and poor and between generations, can be traced back to our systems of tax. If you tax windows, many will sacrifice their daylight. If you tax cigarettes, some people will choose not to smoke; others will take up smuggling. Tax companies too much and many will relocate offshore.

In  Daylight Robbery, Dominic Frisby offers an alternative vision of a system that is as old as civilization itself.

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